Go-ahead for controversial care changes for elderly and disabled people in Bradford district

MANY elderly and disabled people will face hikes in the cost of their care, after council bosses approved controversial changes today.

But there were protests from carers, who said the move could leave vulnerable people isolated.

The changes will bring in means-testing for the first time and could affect around 3,500 people across the district, with some paying more and others less. Local health watchdog Healthwatch and national charity Mencap had both spoken out against the changes ahead of yesterday’s meeting at City Hall.

The meeting heard the move would bring in an extra £1m of revenue to the council, which would be reinvested in adult social care.

Officers said it was very difficult to know how each individual service user would be affected until their circumstances were assessed.

But one carer, Susan Munro, who has two adult sons with learning disabilities, said increased care charges would eat into the amount that people with learning disabilities could spend on activities which stop them from becoming isolated.

She said: “Most learning disabled people are unable to entertain themselves. They can’t follow a television programme or read a book. Most learning disabled people can’t read and they can’t take themselves out for a walk.”

Another carer, Stephen Metcalfe, said the a public consultation had been far too difficult for anyone, let alone people with learning disabilities, to understand.

read more: http://www.thetelegraphandargus.co.uk/NEWS/14753555.Decision_made_on_controversial_care_changes_for_elderly_and_disabled_people/?ref=rss&utm_source=twitterfeed&utm_medium=facebook

MANY elderly and disabled people will face hikes in the cost of their care, after council bosses approved controversial changes today.

But there were protests from carers, who said the move could leave vulnerable people isolated.

The changes will bring in means-testing for the first time and could affect around 3,500 people across the district, with some paying more and others less. Local health watchdog Healthwatch and national charity Mencap had both spoken out against the changes ahead of yesterday’s meeting at City Hall.

The meeting heard the move would bring in an extra £1m of revenue to the council, which would be reinvested in adult social care.

Officers said it was very difficult to know how each individual service user would be affected until their circumstances were assessed.

But one carer, Susan Munro, who has two adult sons with learning disabilities, said increased care charges would eat into the amount that people with learning disabilities could spend on activities which stop them from becoming isolated.

She said: “Most learning disabled people are unable to entertain themselves. They can’t follow a television programme or read a book. Most learning disabled people can’t read and they can’t take themselves out for a walk.”

Another carer, Stephen Metcalfe, said the a public consultation had been far too difficult for anyone, let alone people with learning disabilities, to understand.

MANY elderly and disabled people will face hikes in the cost of their care, after council bosses approved controversial changes today.

But there were protests from carers, who said the move could leave vulnerable people isolated.

The changes will bring in means-testing for the first time and could affect around 3,500 people across the district, with some paying more and others less. Local health watchdog Healthwatch and national charity Mencap had both spoken out against the changes ahead of yesterday’s meeting at City Hall.

The meeting heard the move would bring in an extra £1m of revenue to the council, which would be reinvested in adult social care.

Officers said it was very difficult to know how each individual service user would be affected until their circumstances were assessed.

But one carer, Susan Munro, who has two adult sons with learning disabilities, said increased care charges would eat into the amount that people with learning disabilities could spend on activities which stop them from becoming isolated.

She said: “Most learning disabled people are unable to entertain themselves. They can’t follow a television programme or read a book. Most learning disabled people can’t read and they can’t take themselves out for a walk.”

Another carer, Stephen Metcalfe, said the a public consultation had been far too difficult for anyone, let alone people with learning disabilities, to understand.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s