Mum and FOUR kids forced to sleep in one bed thanks to the benefits cap

Stacey and her four children are all cramped into one double bed with her uncle in a second bedroom and her gran in a third

In a three-bedroom flat on the second floor of a concrete estate in one of the poorer boroughs of London, Stacey is trying to shush her kids.

It’s a cold, clear day, but she can’t take them out because she is a full-time carer for her grandmother, who has ­emphysema, arthritis and a string of other health problems.

Stacey and all four children live in one cramped bedroom, sleeping in one double bed.

Her uncle lives in another bedroom. In the third bedroom, her grandmother is struggling to breathe.

Seven of them in one small flat, kids’ toys mixed with oxygen cylinders under the stairs, a narrow balcony rammed with bin bags full of clothes and children’s scooters.

In a three-bedroom flat on the second floor of a concrete estate in one of the poorer boroughs of London, Stacey is trying to shush her kids. It’s a cold, clear day, but she can’t take them out because she is a full-time carer for her grandmother, who has ­emphysema, arthritis and a string of other health problems.

Stacey and all four children live in one cramped bedroom, sleeping in one double bed. Her uncle lives in another bedroom. In the third bedroom, her grandmother is struggling to breathe.

Seven of them in one small flat, kids’ toys mixed with oxygen cylinders under the stairs, a narrow balcony rammed with bin bags full of clothes and children’s scooters. This is how the Tory flagship policy known as the “ benefit cap” says this family now has to live.

“We used to have our own home a few miles away,” says Stacey, a single mum. “We had two bedrooms and a little bit of space.” But it was in outer London, and the benefit cap means large families in social housing are no longer welcome in the capital.

New figures show 66,900 households have had their housing benefit capped since the policy was introduced in some boroughs in April 2013. The number went up by 4% between May and August this year.

Of the top 20 local authorities with the highest number of households affected by the benefit cap, only two were outside London – they were Birmingham and Edinburgh. Families experience the cap as a cut to housing benefit, meaning they are extremely vulnerable to ­eviction.

The Department for Work and Pensions points to the “off-flow” of people who stop being capped.

Stacey is one of those “success stories” who no longer appear on the statistics. She is no longer capped because she is homeless and living with her nan.

Read more here: http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/mum-four-kids-forced-sleep-6778038

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One thought on “Mum and FOUR kids forced to sleep in one bed thanks to the benefits cap

  1. Pingback: Mum and FOUR kids forced to sleep in one bed thanks to the benefits cap | Benefit tales | sdbast

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